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Cover design by Patty Cabanas; painting by Jack Gustav Moos

Out of the Shadows: A Story of Toni Wolff and Emma Jung
By Elizabeth Clark-Stern

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REVIEWS
Suzanne G. Ropsenthall in
The Journal of Analytical Psychology
Ken Kimmel in Amazon.Com

Lado Shay, author of Psyche

RADIO
Elizabeth interviewed by Bonnie Bright, founder of Depth Psychology
Alliance, on their choice of Elizabeth's OUT OF THE SHADOWS
as on-line book club selection for September 2012:
http://www.depthinsights.com/pages/radio.htm#clark-stern


 

From the premiere performance at the International Jungian Congress in Cape Town, South Africa, August, 2007, with Rikki Ricard as Emma Jung and Elizabeth Clark-Stern as Toni Wolff; production directed by Shierry Nicholsen  

The year is 1910. Sigmund Freud and his heir-apparent, Carl Jung, are changing the way we think about human nature and the mind.

Twenty-two year old TONI WOLFF enters the heart of this world as Jung’s patient. His wife, EMMA JUNG, is twenty-six, a mother of four, aspiring to help her husband create the new science of psychology. Toni Wolff’s fiercely curious mind, and her devotion to Jung, threaten
this aspiration.

Despite their passionate rivalry for Jung’s mind and heart, the two women often find themselves allied. Born of aristocratic Swiss families, they are denied a university education, and long to establish themselves as analysts in their own right.  Passionate and self-educated, they hunger for another intellectual woman with whom to explore the complexities of the soul, the role of women in society, and the archetypal feminine in the affairs of nations.

Their relationship spans 40 years, from pre-World War I to the dawn of the Atomic Age. Their story follows the development of the field of psychology, and the moral and professional choices of some of its major players.

Ultimately, Toni and Emma discover that their individual development is informed by both their antagonism, and their common ground. They struggle to know the essence of the enemy, the “other”, and to claim the power and depth of their own nature.