RETURN TO HOME PAGE



cover design from original art work by Patrice Donohue

ON THE DOORSTEP OF THE CASTLE
A play with dance and music
By Elizabeth Clark-Stern

Click Here To
ORDER FROM AMAZON

Or Here To Order Directly from
FISHER KING PRESS

LINKS TO:

YouTube: Dance Prologue and Opening Scene;
Interview:  "
On the Doorstep of the Castle—An Exploration of the Divine in the
Story of Teresa of Avila" by Bonnie Bright for the online book
club of Depth Psychology Alliance;

Reviews of the book;
Opening pages of the printed play;
Reflections on the creation and performance of the play

 

 
       
     

Lindsey Rosen as Alma de Leon and Elizabeth Clark-Stern as Teresa of Avila
From performance: Seattle, November 30, 2012, Video Recording by Todd Boyle. Sponsored by the Seattle Jung Society and the Jungian Psychotherapists Assn. Choreography by Lindsey Rosen and Anna Mansbridge;
Stage Direction by Anna Mansbridge; Costume Design and Construction by Laura Shea


Our setting is 16th century Spain. The Inquisition has expelled the Jews or forced them to convert. Teresa of Avila is igniting the imagination of the country as the nun who receives messages directly from God. Alma de Leon, a young Jewish converso, appears on Teresa’s doorstep, petitioning to become a novice in her care. Their complex relationship explores the feminine archetypes of the Amazon, and the Medial Woman, in a story that unveils the foundations of psyche’s movement toward wholeness: Kabbalah, and Christian rapture, in an oppressive yet luminous time.


This play is a work of creative imagination based on the interaction of a true historical character and a fictional one. Teresa of Avila is admired to this day not only by Catholics and Christians, but by Taoists and Buddhists, psychologists and poets. Carl Jung was fascinated by her master work, The Interior Castle, for its description of the journey of the soul toward intimacy with God. The fictional character, Alma de Leon, is inspired by twentieth century Jewish philosopher, Edith Stein, who chanced to read Teresa's autobiography, and experienced a profound spiritual awakening that led her to become a Carmelite nun. "What if these two were to meet?" the playwright asked herself, crafting the character of Alma as a Jewish woman true to her time and place in history. The teaching of the ancient Jewish mystical tradition, the Kabbalah, was strictly forbidden by the Inquisition, and yet Alma is haunted by it, even as she dons the habit of a nun and struggles to find her identity in the presence of her passionate, spiritually adventurous mentor.

 

RETURN TO HOME PAGE